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Frequently Asked Questions(FAQ)


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  • WHO TO CALL WHEN YOU HAVE A CONCERN ABOUT AN ANIMAL

    • Who should I contact if I witness or suspect animal abuse?

      Contact the Ontario SPCA Provincial Office Hotline at 1-888-ONT-SPCA (668-7722). For an emergency after regular business hours dial extension 1. To help ensure a quick response to an urgent com
    • Who do I call about free-roaming dogs or stray cats?

      If the animal is a stray please call your local animal control department found in the yellow pages. If the animal has been abandoned by its owners please call your local Ontario SPCA Community or the
    • Accessibility at the Ontario SPCA

      In fulfilling our mission, the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals strives at all times to provide its goods and services in a way that respects the dignity and independence of people with disabilities. We are also committed to giving people with disabilities the same opportunity to access our goods and services and allowing them to benefit from the same services, in the same place and in a similar way as other customers. Comments and feedback regarding the way the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals provides goods and services to people with disabilities or to request a copy of our Customer Service Policy can be made by email to our Human Resources coordinator at jjordan@ospca.on.ca or by phone at 905-898-7122. To learn about the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (2005) legislation and standards, visit the Accessibility Directorate of Ontario
    • What are the Ontario SPCA's core values?

      The Ontario SPCA believes that: The Ontario SPCA must act to prevent cruelty and to encourage consideration for all animals. No animal should suffer. All animals should have a good quality of life and should be treated with compassion. The Society must advocate for improved animal welfare and protection. Those who abuse or neglect animals should be appropriately penalized. All animal welfare organizations should work cooperatively for the benefit of animals. The Society should set high standards for animal care, protection and shelter. The Society must educate the public on animal welfare. Dedicated and committed volunteers and staff are essential to the success of the Society. All those who contribute to the success of the Society deserve recognition and appreciation. The Society should serve the whole province.
  • ANIMAL CARE SERVICES AT THE ONTARIO SPCA

    • How long can an animal stay at an Ontario SPCA Community?

      Ontario SPCA Communities keep the animal as long as space permits and an adoptable animal remains physically and mentally healthy.
    • When I adopt a dog or cat, what does the adoption fee include?

      Depending on the Ontario SPCA Community the adoption fee can include: Vaccinations Identification (e.g. microchip) Deworming Spay or neuter (dogs and cats) Carry box for cats
    • What is the Ontario SPCA's euthanasia policy?

      The Ontario SPCA takes the issue of euthanasia very seriously. It is only done when there is no other humane option available. Reasons the Ontario SPCA euthanizes include: terminal illness or injury where there is no possibility of recovery, behavioural problems that pose a threat to other animals or humans, stray or feral overpopulation, disease transmission, and old age where the quality of life is impaired by major loss of functions. Sadly, in some cases animals may be euthanized due to shelter overcrowding. Overcrowding threatens the lives of all the animals in our care due to stress, weakened immune systems and increased risk of disease transmission. This requires us to make difficult decisions about euthanasia based on health, physical, emotional and psychological suffering, and the best interests of the hundreds of animals receiving lifesaving care in a facility. We ask that pet owners place identification on their animals in the form of ID tags, licenses or microchips. We also ask that all pets be spayed or neutered. The pet overpopulation crisis can be managed with this one simple procedure. For more information on the benefits of having your pet spayed or neutered, visit www.fixyourpetc.ca. Also, please contact your local shelter to learn more about adopting an animal, or fostering pets to help provide a temporary home to animals in need.
    • How many animals do Ontario SPCA Communities care for?

      Each year more than 50 Ontario SPCA Communities provide care for tens of thousands of animals.
    • How much does it cost to care for each animal?

      The average cost to care for each animal varies from several hundreds of dollars to thousands of dollars depending on the condition of the animal brought to the shelter, any medical treatment or foster care required, and how long it takes the animal to be adopted.
    • Does the Ontario SPCA accept owner-surrendered animals?

      Ontario SPCA Communities do accept owner-surrendered animals with a nominal surrender fee that covers a small portion of the animal's care while at the shelter. If you're considering surrendering your pet because you feel unable to deal with their behaviour, we encourage you to seek advice and training to work with behaviour problems before making a final decision. Most behaviour problems arise due to miscommunication between the owner and the pet (for example, pushing or yelling at a dog for jumping up only encourages more jumping), or when a certain need of the pet is not being met (inadequate exercise can lead to hyperactive and destructive dogs). If you are a dog owner, you may wish to visit the Canadian Association of Professional Pet Dog Trainers' website to help find trainers in your area. (Please note: The Ontario SPCA does not endorse any individual trainer and encourages people to choose positive trainers who use methods that do not cause pain or suffering to dogs, but help foster a trusting relationship.) Veterinarians may also provide helpful advice or refer you to someone specializing in animal behavior in your area. Seek out "positive" trainers that will teach you how to motivate your dog to do the behaviours you'd like in a "positive" manner that enhances your relationship with your pet and builds trust. Avoid trainers who advocate the use of force, yelling, threats, punishment and violence. With a little patience and effort many behaviour problems can be resolved and you can be rewarded with a well-behaved animal and years of love and companionship.
  • ONTARIO SPCA GENERAL OPERATIONS

    • What is the structure of the Ontario SPCA?

      Shelters: The Ontario SPCA is comprised of more than 50 Communities providing care and shelter for tens of thousands of animals each year. Inspectors and Agents: The Society Inspectors and Agents, who investigate cases of animal cruelty and neglect, have the same powers as police officers when enforcing animal protection laws. Under the Ontario SPCA Act, first decreed in 1919, the Society may intervene directly to rescue animals at risk. This unique authority is both our privilege and our strength. Board of Directors: The Society is managed by a voluntary provincial Board of Directors. This board has representation from appointees of Ontario SPCA Communities who have been elected at the Annual General Meeting. The Board of Directors is responsible for the Society's operations, policy decisions and budget control. Members bring with them a variety of expertise and experience and also serve on advisory committees that concentrate on specific aspects of the Society's work, recommending courses of action to the full board.
    • How are the Ontario SPCA Provincial Office and its Communities funded?

      The Ontario SPCA and its Communities are charitable organizations that rely on the generosity of its supporters, including individuals, associations and corporations. The Ontario SPCA is not a government organization.
    • What is the difference between the Ontario SPCA and Ontario Humane Society (OHS)?

      The Ontario SPCA (or Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) and the Ontario Humane Society are the same entity. Humane Society is a common term and is used by some of Ontario SPCA Communities.
    • Who do I contact if I have a complaint about an Ontario SPCA Order or the removal of an animal?

      Any Ontario SPCA Orders, or the removal of an animal under the authority of the Ontario SPCA Act, are actions that may be appealed to the Animal Care Review Board of Ontario. The Animal Care Review Board is an independent tribunal, with members appointed by the Lieutenant Governor in Council. An animal owner or custodian who considers themselves aggrieved may take advantage of this route of appeal. This is outlined in the Ontario SPCA Act, subsection 17.(1): The owner or custodian of any animal who considers themself aggrieved by an order made under subsection 13 (1) or by the removal of an animal under subsection 14 (1) may, within five business days of receiving notice of the order or removal, appeal against the order or request the return of the animal by notice in writing to the chair of the Board. R.S.O. 1990, c. O.36, s. 17 (1); 1993, c. 27, Sched.; 2006, c. 19, Sched. F, s. 3 (1). This information is clearly printed on all relevant Ontario SPCA forms, and includes the contact information for the Chair of the Animal Care Review Board.
    • Who do I contact if I have a complaint about an Ontario SPCA Community investigator?

      If a concerned citizen would like to issue a complaint against the Ontario SPCA, or any of the officers appointed under the authority of the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (Ontario SPCA) Act, the following contacts are available. At each level of management, an examination of the relevant facts and a decision regarding appropriate action would be made and taken. If a person chose to circumvent the process as described, their concern would be appropriately redirected. Step 1: Staff Supervisor If a person wishes to register a complaint regarding the specific conduct of an appointed Agent or Inspector, whether that Agent or Inspector is employed by, or a volunteer for, a Branch of the Ontario SPCA or an Affiliate Society, the person should direct their complaint to the immediate supervisor of the said Agent or Inspector. That immediate supervisor may be an Affiliate or Branch Manager, or other supervisor located at a local Society. A local Society will consider the allegations and take appropriate action where warranted using the hierarchy of that organization (Manager, Inspector, local Board of Directors). Information regarding staff disciplinary action may not be fully disclosed to the complainant if privacy legislation restricts or prohibits that. Step 2: Senior Inspector If the person is not content with the results of any action taken as a result of that complaint, the citizen may forward their complaint to the Senior Inspector for the Region. Step 3: Chief Inspector In the event that the person is not content with the response provided by the Senior Inspector, they may forward their concern to the attention of the Chief Inspector, located at the provincial office. Step 4: Chief Executive Officer The Chief Executive Officer of the Society would be the next level of management to respond to a concern. Step 5: Board of Directors Lastly, the concerned person could ask to have the Board of Directors of the Society hear their concern. The contact information for any of the Senior Inspectors, Branch or Affiliate Managers, the Chief Inspector, the Chief Executive Officer or the Board of Directors may be obtained by calling the provincial office of the Ontario SPCA and making a direct inquiry.
    • Animal welfare and animal rights – what’s the difference?

    • What is the difference between a Branch and an Affiliate?

    • What is the Animal Welfare Philosophy of the Ontario SPCA?

      The Ontario SPCA is an open admission, For Life, organization; we strive to accept all animals.


      When entering one of our facilities, each animal is given his/her own animal care plan. The animal’s best interests are always at the forefront of all decisions we make, including adoption, foster care, veterinary care, transfer to other adoption centres or rescue groups or, in some cases, euthanasia.


      Our staff are professionals who work in this field because they love animals, and the decisions they make are made for the good of the animal and of the communities that they will live in.


      Our Animal Welfare philosophy leads us to focus on optimum solutions for animals in our shelters including high-volume spay/neuter services, adoption programs like Meet Your Match, animal fostering, animal transfer programs, humane education for the prevention of cruelty, enforcement of the Ontario SPCA Act and rescue & relief services.


      The Ontario SPCA works in partnership with many organizations to ensure that optimum animal care strategies are available for communities across Ontario and we extend our programs and resources to Animal Welfare organizations across the province and around the world.


      For more information on our Animal Welfare programs and services, please visit our website, www.ontariospca.ca



      What is a “No Kill” facility?


      The term ‘no kill’ can be a contentious one in animal sheltering and the term is used differently by different groups.


      A true ‘no kill’ facility is one where animals are kept alive at any cost, and no animal is euthanized, regardless of state of health (including emotional health) or temperament.


      Unfortunately, many of these facilities do not recognize that emotional and behavioural suffering is just as damaging as physical suffering, and/or will adopt out animals with aggressive temperaments who are a danger to the community.


      For example, if an animal is physically healthy, but is showing signs of emotional distress in the form of behaviours caused by living in a kennel or cage for years, a true ‘no kill’ facility would keep the animal alive, without consideration for the emotional and behavioural suffering this animal is experiencing.


      Ideally, the animal would be provided with in-shelter enrichment and/or the opportunity to go to foster care to alleviate the emotional distress, but this isn’t always an option for many facilities. Unfortunately, many of these facilities are more like ‘warehouses’ for animals, rather than safe havens.


      There are other groups who refer to themselves as ‘no kill’, who actually will euthanize animals, thereby negating the term ‘no-kill’. Often these groups euthanize only for health related reasons and often only in the case where the animal could not live without on-going physical suffering.


      Again, these can be places that do not recognize or treat emotional or behavioural distress or suffering.


      There are also ‘limited admission’ facilities that often also refer to themselves as ‘no kill’.


      These facilities pre-screen the animals admitted into their shelter, usually choosing not to admit animals who suffer from minor-to-major behavioural problems, aggression, or suffer from any illness.


      These groups often take only the ‘easiest to adopt’ animals, thereby allowing them to say they are ‘no kill’ simply because the animals they take in are ‘easy’ animals to adopt back out again. Other animals who do not meet the admission requirements are simply referred to other facilities.


      If a shelter has a “no kill” policy, it is important for the public to ask the shelter to define the “no kill” policy, so that the public may understand which definition the shelter is practicing.


      The ASPCA has a similar philosophy towards “no kill” facilities:


      ”The ASPCA believes that unwanted pets deserve a dignified, painless death rather than suffer from such cruelties as malnutrition, disease or trauma, outcomes commonly associated with an unwanted and/or uncared-for existence. Similarly, long-term housing of individual dogs and cats in cages without access to exercise or social activities is not an acceptable alternative. Euthanasia must be understood for what it is: a last-step, end-of-the-road option to spare animals further hardship and suffering.”


      For more information on the ASPCA, please visit www.aspca.org.


  • OTHER FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS



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